Reasons why you need to use atomic clock

atomic clock

While the time base of a traditional clock is the oscillating pendulum, the atomic clock is based on the properties of atoms transitioning between different energy states. The first person to express the notion of the atomic clock was the Columbia University Isidor Rabi in the year 1945. He suggested that a clock could be made from a technique he developed in the 1930s, known as atomic beam magnetic resonance. From 1949, the National Bureau of Standards introduced the world’s first atomic clock with the ammonia molecule as the source of vibrations, and the first atomic clock with cesium atoms as the vibration source has been declared in 1952.

Cesium 133 is the component most commonly chosen for atomic clocks. The performance of a cesium-beam atomic clock is based on the transition between two states from the cesium atom. Rubidium can be used in atomic clocks, and it lowers the price nevertheless, rubidium clocks are less secure. Hydrogen Masers have short-term stability and reduced long-term precision. Mercury ions are also utilized in certain atomic clocks. Strontium has a hyperfine transition that’s not precise. But strontium can be driven which could be used to create a very inexpensive, durable, and streamlined clock. Cesium atomic clocks are used in labs Such as the National Institute of Standards and Technology to keep national time scales.

For the clock to begin Ticking, liquid or solid Caesium is heated in order that electrons boil and pass to a high vacuum tube. Atoms that have the ideal energy condition proceed to pass through an intense microwave area. The microwave energy within the area sweeps back and forth between narrow ranges of frequencies, crossing exactly 9,192,631,770 Hertz in every cycle. The scope always stays close to this frequency, as it comes from the crystal oscillator. As soon as the Cesium 133 atom receives microwave energy in precisely the correct frequency, it changes its energy condition. In the far end of this Vacuum tube, the atoms experience another magnetic field. This one divides the atoms which were exposed to the exact frequency while within the microwave area.

This summit is used to make corrections to the crystal oscillator and by extension the microwave area, making sure it remains exactly on frequency. From there, various other consumer atomic clocks get their precise readings by either radio waves or satellite, based on their nature. From the continental United States and surrounding areas, wall mounted atomic clocks receive their signal from a radio signal run by the National Institute of Standards and Technology from Colorado. The NIST operated radio channel, which can be attached directly to an atomic clock and known as the WWVB, uses a high powered output on a comparatively low frequency to give it its extraordinary reach. Some wrist watches tap into this for accurate time also.